Post Punk with Patrick: The Hotelier, Like No Place is There

Patrick Bransfield
Staff Writer

The Hotelier’s (pronounced The Hotel Year) sophomore LP “Home, Like No Place is There” is

Photo Credit: Google Images

Photo Credit: Google Images

a phenomenal piece of art packed full of well-thought out song structures and solid playing. However, more than anything “Home, Like No Place is There” is a poetic account of guilt, love, destructive relationships and most prevalent – loss, experienced by singer Christian Holden. The album opens calmly with “An Introduction to the Album” as listeners practically wake-up into Holden’s shoes – “Open the curtains/ singing birds to me ‘tear the buildings down.’ You felt blessed to receive that pleasant sound.” Holden’s lyrics flow flawlessly through enjambments with a pleasant tone and coherence over soft guitars, setting the atmospheric foundation of the album. The focus shifts as Holden sheds some light on specific events such as talking a friend off of a ledge – “Just remember when you’d call me to come/ take a deep breath, and then jump.”

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Smart Art: Pink and gender roles in the art world

Sara Torgerson
Arts Editor

For the past couple of months I have been thinking about gender roles. I think of my introductory

Expressive piece representing pink as the color of life (Photo: Google Images)

Expressive piece representing pink as the color of life (Photo: Google Images)

lessons from Simone de Beauvoir’s “The Second Sex” and her proclamation that women are more loyal to men of their same class or social circle than women who share their struggle as the “second sex.” Beauvoir recognized the ways in which women have played a part in their own oppression. I see myself and others do this too. Until recently, I always competed with other women in the arts rather than see how we could work together. Sometimes it seems as though there are only so many positions for women, therefore, one must stomp on the fingers of others.
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Youtube’s hottest bands preform in Philadelphia Freaks and Geeks Tour

Christopher Riley
Associate Editor

YouTubers have become a new source of pop culture in the last few years. Bands and artists have been able to create a following that can only be described as grassroots pop culture. What this means is that the bands and artists on YouTube upload their videos after shooting them themselves, editing them themselves, and uploading them themselves.

Anissa with lead singer of King the Kid, David Michael Frank signing a King the Kid original song.

Anissa with lead singer of King the Kid, David Michael Frank signing a King the Kid original song. (Photo: Christopher Riley)

On Feb. 8, I went to a concert in Philadelphia, which was a part of the Freaks and Geeks Tour headlined by Hollywood Ending with opening acts This is All Now and King the Kid. The three bands started on YouTube, uploading their videos and gaining a following all on their own. No producers, no record labels, nothing. They worked for everything they got. I was mainly there to photograph King the Kid but I happened to take pictures of the other bands as well.
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Nude art comes to the Silber: Femme, A Closer Look at the Female Form

Christine Cherry
Sports Editor

My academic interests include the study of the female physical body and its varying interpretations across cultures and eras. The current show in the Silber Gallery, “Femme,” showcases artists’ own perspectives of the feminine form. I was fortunate enough to attend the gallery opening on Feb. 6, to hear the artists (all females) and talk about their pieces over sangria and cheese.
The exhibit features varying media, from videos, photography, painting, and live performance. Many of the artists are MFA students, and some found artwork later in life. Despite all of their different backgrounds, there seems to be a connecting thread throughout the work: that even in 2014, women still receive criticism for using their bodies in any way, whether it’s in artwork, dance, or the like.
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Smart Art: Starting the conversation

Sara Torgerson
Arts Editor

On Feb. 5 students at Wellesley College, just outside of Boston, were startled to see the figure of a half naked man, lost in the

The Sleep Walker statue at Wellesley College (Photo: Google)

The Sleep Walker statue at Wellesley College (Photo: Google)

snow. At first glance the man is middle aged, wearing nothing but white briefs, and has a small belly hanging over his waistband. His arms are stretch out causing him to appear like he’s grabbing for something or is confused. At first glance you cannot tell if he’s real or not, but after a couple minutes, one realizes that he’s definitely a sculpture.
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