Final’s Week Calls for Yoga

Dani Meir-Levi
Staff Writer

Everyone has different ways of coping with stress. Since finals week is around the corner, many students are doing their best to try and stay sane during the home stretch of the semester. A good way to de-stress may include going to dinner with your friends, watching your favorite movie, or exercising. It depends on the person. Personally, I find that the best way to de-stress and loosen your mind is by taking a yoga class.
This mind-body practice has become extremely popular within the last 10 years. It has been known for its ability to reduce stress and boost well-being, but it also offers a wide-range of health benefits that rival other forms of exercise. For example, like cardio fitness, yoga has been known to lower the risk of heart disease and help maintain a healthy weight. Even after a few months of yoga, many seem to have improved lung capacity, anxiety relief, improved sense of balance, and surprisingly have improved sexual function. Studies have shown that yoga has been more effective in reducing pain and improving mood than standard medical treatment for certain health problem.
Charm City Yoga on Allegheny Avenue offers a 30-day trial for new yoga students. This includes one class a day. If you choose to purchase a trial online, instead of in the studio, you get an entire month of yoga for only $25! I get it – money is tight for a college student. However, taking a yoga class will surely pay off during finals week.

Goucher Eats: Senior eats finale

Kathryn Walker
Co-Features Editor

This is my belated thank you letter, the one that extends hundreds of miles and

Kathryn Walker ‘14 and her brothers outside Stimson Hall after moving in Freshman year (Photo: Courtesy of Kathryn Walker)

Kathryn Walker ‘14 and her brothers outside Stimson Hall after moving in Freshman year (Photo: Courtesy of Kathryn Walker)

oceans wide, the one that I should have written to so many people for so many things, the one that never came in the mail or still lies unwritten on my desk.  For the things big and small, heroic or ordinary, important or inconsequential.  For the people, moments, and places that have swept me off my feet and shaken my small corner of the world.  As the Dictionary of Obsolete Sorrows so aptly describes, a memory, a lifetime, “are not just the moments, not the grand gestures or the catered ceremonies, not the poised person smiling in photos, they’re the invisible things. The minutes, the cheap raw material of ordinary time.”
Four years ago, my family – both parents and all three brothers in tow – dropped me off at Goucher in the sweltering Baltimore heat for my first cross-country pre-season, my first real Goucher memory.  After four hours of unpacking, sweating, and bickering, I waved them off with a factitiously haughty, “I’ll see you at Thanksgiving – maybe.”  Five minutes later, I was lying on my bed staring at the cracks in the ceiling and wishing with all my heart that my family would hear my silent thoughts and come back for me and take me home.  I came to the conclusion that if this was what college would be like – silent, lonely, sweaty – then these next four years were going to suck.
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Staff profile: Stacy Cooper Patterson, OSE

Rachel Brustein
Co-Features Editor

Stacy Cooper Patterson has been working at Goucher since 2001 and has served in

Director of Student Engagement Stacy Cooper Patterson (Photo: Courtesy of Patterson)

Director of Student Engagement Stacy Cooper Patterson (Photo: Courtesy of Patterson)

four different positions during her time here. Currently she is the director of Student Engagement, a position she has held for almost a year, but she began as the director of Residence Life (now Community Living), then as a career counselor in the Career Development Office, and most recently as the associate director of leadership development in the Office of Student Engagement (OSE).
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Club profile: Chemistry club

Jessica Gude
Staff Writer

A common misconception about scientists is that they spend hours on end cooped up alone in a lab, surrounded by a jungle of beakers, burets, and Erlenmeyer flasks. While the forest of tools may be correct, the solidarity certainly isn’t. As anyone who has ever been in Hoffberger Science can tell you, scientists are anything but solitariness. Science, especially today, is a team effort. Scientists spend time together both in the lab and outside of it. This sense of scientific community is evident at Goucher and is embodied by the Goucher Chemistry Club. The club has several events throughout the year that bring together students and professors from the Chemistry and Biology departments.
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In Memoriam: Matthew Gabriel

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