SGA committee rewrites constitution, prepares for student vote

Jessica Gude
Staff Writer

In the last few days of January term, the Student Government Association (SGA) Constitutional Committee met to rewrite the SGA constitution. The group of 13 students was formed last fall after members of the student assembly expressed problems with the constitution. The committee gathered feedback and made major changes to the constitution. The structure of the senate, the class council, election procedures, and the name of the student government have undergone a near-complete transformation. The new form of student government is called Goucher Student Government (GSG).
Complaints about the old constitution and the old student government were wide ranging. Many students felt a lack of communication and connection to government processes. More specifically, students expressed a lack of transparency between students, student government officers, administration, and faculty. For example, Senate positions were only granted to clubs, leaving those students not involved without a voice.
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Rachel Laser speaks about Employment Non Discrimination Act

Max Adelstein
Contributor

Rachel Laser, the deputy director of the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism (RAC) spoke at

Students posing with Rachel Laser after her speech to the community. (Photo: Rachel Brustein)

Students posing with Rachel Laser after her speech to the community. (Photo: Rachel Brustein)

Goucher on Feb. 19 about the National Employee Non-Discrimination act (ENDA). She discussed the new provisions currently under consideration for the ENDA and explained how the students can get involved in the pro-LGBT movement and make a meaningful contribution to the fight for the amendment of ENDA.
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Provost Marc Roy announces Dr. LaJerne Cornish as Goucher’s new associate dean of undergraduate studies

Jaclyn Peiser
Editor-in-Chief

Samuel Kessler
News Editor

Provost Marc Roy announced in an email to the faculty and staff on Tuesday, Feb. 16 that LaJerne Cornish will assume the role of associate dean of undergraduate studies next fall.

LaJerne Cornish, chair of the education department and chair of faculty, in her office in Van Meter (Photo: Christopher Riley)

LaJerne Cornish, chair of the education department and chair of faculty, in her office in Van Meter (Photo: Christopher Riley)

“I’m very excited. I’ve worked closely with LaJerne in her role as chair of the faculty for the last three years,” Roy said. “She is absolutely wonderful in the way she works with students and her colleagues and I am very excited to have the chance to continue working with her in this capacity.”
The Provost first announced the search for current Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies Amanda Thom Woodson’s replacement in a Jan. 13 letter to faculty and staff. Woodson will meet her two-term limit this spring semester and Roy asked for nominations and self-nominations. According to Woodson, other members of the staff and faculty asked to be part of the interview process, including Woodson’s assistant, the Director of the Academic Center for Excellence (ACE) Peejo Sehr, and Frona Brown, the college disabilities specialist. After going through the nomination and interview processes, Roy explained, “LaJerne was the best candidate.”
This sentiment continues across the college community.
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Hoffberger renovations benefit music department

Brandon Orr
Copy Editor

Arriving on campus, students may have noticed that the Hoffberger Science building has fully reopened this

New entrance to Hoffberger Science Building (Photo: Nora Morgan)

New entrance to Hoffberger Science Building (Photo: Nora Morgan)

semester without fanfare. The building now has a handicap accessible ramp, new carpeting, and a lounge area near the main entrance. While campus-wide reaction to the change has been minimal, the music department is excited about the renovation and their new location inside the building.
“We’re all ecstatic,” said Kitty Gratz, the program coordinator for the music department. “We’re getting equipment that we need, the software that we need, the space.”
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Ungar works with White House to increase aid

Jaclyn Peiser
Editor-in-Chief

President Barack Obama briefly discussed his plan to make higher education more accessible to low income

President Obama delivers his 2014 State of the Union address (Photo: Google Images)

President Obama delivers his 2014 State of the Union address (Photo: Google Images)

families in his Jan. 28 State of the Union address. Twelve days prior, the president and first lady hosted a College Opportunity Summit, in which Goucher President Sanford Ungar and over 100 other college and university presidents were celebrated for solidifying their commitment to the cause.
“The White House just organized a College Opportunity Summit where already, 150 universities, businesses, and nonprofits have made concrete commitments to reduce inequality in access to higher education –and help every hardworking kid go to college and succeed when they get to campus,” President Obama said in the State of the Union address.
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