Marriage equality in Uganda

Jessica Gude 
Staff Writer

For several years in the United States, a major item on the political agenda of the national and state

Kenyan activists protest outside the Ugandan high commision over the country’s anti-gay bill (Photo: Google Images)

Kenyan activists protest outside the Ugandan high commision over the country’s anti-gay bill (Photo: Google Images)

legislators has been marriage equality.  Currently 17 states have officially legalized same sex marriage, meaning that it is legal in just over one third of the states. The global percentage is far more modest. While a total of 17 countries, mostly European and South American, have legalized same sex marriage, the general outcry as of late has been against these unions. 
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Senior reflects on future and impact of study abroad experience.Ryan Derham Co-global Editor

Ryan Derham
Co-global Editor

It’s been over one year since I returned from studying abroad in India. I remember like it was yesterday, writing in my blog the night before my plane took off: This is my chance to go and I’m taking it. With few responsibilities midway through my college career, I didn’t have to think long about who and what I was leaving behind, I just left. Since returning, my hands have found their proper place using a knife and fork – they no longer shake. But I’m starting to forget what it meant to live in a country that is not my own, what the value of the rupee is and what the heart of India looks like.
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Post Punk with Patrick: The Hotelier, Like No Place is There

Patrick Bransfield
Staff Writer

The Hotelier’s (pronounced The Hotel Year) sophomore LP “Home, Like No Place is There” is

Photo Credit: Google Images

Photo Credit: Google Images

a phenomenal piece of art packed full of well-thought out song structures and solid playing. However, more than anything “Home, Like No Place is There” is a poetic account of guilt, love, destructive relationships and most prevalent – loss, experienced by singer Christian Holden. The album opens calmly with “An Introduction to the Album” as listeners practically wake-up into Holden’s shoes – “Open the curtains/ singing birds to me ‘tear the buildings down.’ You felt blessed to receive that pleasant sound.” Holden’s lyrics flow flawlessly through enjambments with a pleasant tone and coherence over soft guitars, setting the atmospheric foundation of the album. The focus shifts as Holden sheds some light on specific events such as talking a friend off of a ledge – “Just remember when you’d call me to come/ take a deep breath, and then jump.”

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Smart Art: Pink and gender roles in the art world

Sara Torgerson
Arts Editor

For the past couple of months I have been thinking about gender roles. I think of my introductory

Expressive piece representing pink as the color of life (Photo: Google Images)

Expressive piece representing pink as the color of life (Photo: Google Images)

lessons from Simone de Beauvoir’s “The Second Sex” and her proclamation that women are more loyal to men of their same class or social circle than women who share their struggle as the “second sex.” Beauvoir recognized the ways in which women have played a part in their own oppression. I see myself and others do this too. Until recently, I always competed with other women in the arts rather than see how we could work together. Sometimes it seems as though there are only so many positions for women, therefore, one must stomp on the fingers of others.
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Movie Review: “Frozen”

Samantha Cooper
Staff Writer

By now, you’ve probably seen “Frozen.” If you haven’t, you’ve either been living under a rock or you’re anti-Disney. If you are the former, see it. If you are the latter, see it. The movie which came out in November is STILL showing in some theaters. By the end of February, the movie had grossed over $985,000,000 worldwide, which puts it as the second highest grossing animated film ever.
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Cove Point: A chance to stop disaster in Maryland

Therese Robbins
Contributor

There is a threat coming to the state of Maryland in the form of a new plan by Dominion Resources,

Goucher students pose together before the march on the White House begins in protest of the Cove Point fracking station (Photo: Courtesy of Therese Robbins)

Goucher students pose together before the march on the White House begins in protest of the Cove Point fracking station (Photo: Courtesy of Therese Robbins)

Inc. for a $3.8 billion liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facility in Cove Point, Md. Dominion, a company based out of Richmond, Va., is one of the biggest producers and transporters of energy in the United States. They currently own an LNG import facility in Cove Point, and would like to further develop it into a fully functioning export facility. Natural gas, a fossil fuel found deep underground that consists mainly of methane, is touted as a cleaner burning fuel in comparison to coal or oil, yet there is some controversy about this source of energy. Natural gas is extracted from the ground by hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”), a process of pumping a mixture of water, sand, and chemicals into a fracking well at very high pressure and exploding the layers of rock so natural gas trapped within the rock can escape and be captured aboveground. This drilling practice and the development needed for it have been known to pollute drinking water sources like ponds or aquifers with chemicals and methane, pollute the air surrounding the drilling wells with toxic gases, deteriorate local roads, and otherwise harm or endanger local people’s well-being and livelihoods. The proposed LNG export facility would depend on this harmful drilling practice, and also require pipelines, compressor stations, and its own power plant to fuel the liquefaction of the gas.
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Johanna Kandel and life beyond your eating disorder

Sarah Pardus
Chief Copy Editor

As someone who admittedly walks past the tables in Pearlstone without stopping more often than I probably should, I know how easy it can be to ignore some of the events happening on campus. There are just so many. All. The. Time. For those of you who, like me, don’t stop at the tables to check out whatever cause is being promoted this week, you may or may not have known that last week was National Eating Disorder Awareness (NEDA) Week. I knew not because I stopped at the table, but because I am part of the statistic that is plastered all over the NEDA website. I am one of the 20 million women who will suffer from an eating disorder at some point in her life.
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