Goucher Eats: Senior eats finale

Kathryn Walker
Co-Features Editor

This is my belated thank you letter, the one that extends hundreds of miles and

Kathryn Walker ‘14 and her brothers outside Stimson Hall after moving in Freshman year (Photo: Courtesy of Kathryn Walker)

Kathryn Walker ‘14 and her brothers outside Stimson Hall after moving in Freshman year (Photo: Courtesy of Kathryn Walker)

oceans wide, the one that I should have written to so many people for so many things, the one that never came in the mail or still lies unwritten on my desk.  For the things big and small, heroic or ordinary, important or inconsequential.  For the people, moments, and places that have swept me off my feet and shaken my small corner of the world.  As the Dictionary of Obsolete Sorrows so aptly describes, a memory, a lifetime, “are not just the moments, not the grand gestures or the catered ceremonies, not the poised person smiling in photos, they’re the invisible things. The minutes, the cheap raw material of ordinary time.”
Four years ago, my family – both parents and all three brothers in tow – dropped me off at Goucher in the sweltering Baltimore heat for my first cross-country pre-season, my first real Goucher memory.  After four hours of unpacking, sweating, and bickering, I waved them off with a factitiously haughty, “I’ll see you at Thanksgiving – maybe.”  Five minutes later, I was lying on my bed staring at the cracks in the ceiling and wishing with all my heart that my family would hear my silent thoughts and come back for me and take me home.  I came to the conclusion that if this was what college would be like – silent, lonely, sweaty – then these next four years were going to suck.
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Staff profile: Stacy Cooper Patterson, OSE

Rachel Brustein
Co-Features Editor

Stacy Cooper Patterson has been working at Goucher since 2001 and has served in

Director of Student Engagement Stacy Cooper Patterson (Photo: Courtesy of Patterson)

Director of Student Engagement Stacy Cooper Patterson (Photo: Courtesy of Patterson)

four different positions during her time here. Currently she is the director of Student Engagement, a position she has held for almost a year, but she began as the director of Residence Life (now Community Living), then as a career counselor in the Career Development Office, and most recently as the associate director of leadership development in the Office of Student Engagement (OSE).
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Club profile: Chemistry club

Jessica Gude
Staff Writer

A common misconception about scientists is that they spend hours on end cooped up alone in a lab, surrounded by a jungle of beakers, burets, and Erlenmeyer flasks. While the forest of tools may be correct, the solidarity certainly isn’t. As anyone who has ever been in Hoffberger Science can tell you, scientists are anything but solitariness. Science, especially today, is a team effort. Scientists spend time together both in the lab and outside of it. This sense of scientific community is evident at Goucher and is embodied by the Goucher Chemistry Club. The club has several events throughout the year that bring together students and professors from the Chemistry and Biology departments.
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Graduating seniors plan to teach abroad

Ryan Derham
Co-Global Editor

There are quite a few graduating seniors who are planning to venture outside the

Goucher students abroad in Paris posing infront of the Eiffel Tower last spring (Photo: Courtesy of Sarah Rubinstein ‘14)

Goucher students abroad in Paris posing infront of the Eiffel Tower last spring (Photo: Courtesy of Sarah Rubinstein ‘14)

United States next year. Three graduating seniors, in particular, Sarah Rubinstein, Ben Scrimshaw, and Fundi Fihlani, will all be teaching abroad after graduation. For some, it is a break from undergrad, a time to figure out what to do next. For others it is returning home.
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Nigerian girls kidnapped by Boko Haram

Sarah Callendar
Staff Writer

In what many are calling a direct attack on the education of women around the world, the militant group Boko Haram kidnapped more than 300 Northern Nigerian girls on April 14. The Muslim-Extremist group’s name means “Western education is a sin” in the Hausa language. The armed terrorists took the girls from a boarding school in Chibok, Nigeria while they were sleeping. The terrorists burned the school to the ground and then drove the girls away into the forests that border Cameroon. It has been confirmed that at least 53 girls have escaped but the remaining number of girls still missing is unknown as the school enrollment records are still being reviewed. The girls were Christian and Muslim but all of them were seeking higher education in order to seek a career in medicine, law, education or other valued professions.
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Post Punk with Patrick: Circa Survive cover

Patrick Bransfield
Staff Writer

Record Store Day, known of by only a handful of music listeners was held Saturday,

Circa band members (Photo: Google Images)

Circa band members (Photo: Google Images)

April 19 this year.  Of the many records unveiled, indie label Robotic Empire put together a Nirvana In Utero Tribute Album. Circa Survive is one of the twelve bands paying tribute to the third and final Nirvana album.
Circa’s take on “Scentless Apprentice” is very similar to the original, the only differences being the timbre of Anthony Green’s voice, and slight instrumental variations during the noise-filled bridges of the song.
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Smart Art: A challenge to experience the art of living

Sara Torgerson
Arts Editor

Dear Reader,

This is the last Smart Art article I’ll write you and the last time you’ll see an Arts section in The Q. The past couple of years writing for The Quindecim has been my pleasure. I hope all who read this have enjoyed reading my articles as much as I’ve loved writing them. That said, I will start this final article.
What type of art will you make? I’m not talking about physical manifestations of art like sculpture or painting, but a metaphysical art. The type of art that is intention and creation. The art that is solely your own medium and is entirely up to you to put out into the universe. This art is your passion, it is the small rings of change that you as a person will make –big or small, positive or negative.
These are the thoughts that keep me up at night. What is my art? Though I’m not entirely sure what I’ll put out into the world, I find that this is the time for figuring it out. As I leave college, I realize that this is the transition that forces my peers and me to look at our lives and act. This is a time in life where we can’t tread water without drowning. So, long-winded as this is, and not about traditional art, I wonder what your medium is? Are you living your life with a sense or artistry? Are you creating something by learning, or meeting new people, finding a job, finding a lover, falling in love, or doing anything that qualifies as living life? Or are you a passive bystander of life –an anti-artist.
If that is the case, I challenge you to do something. I encourage you to live life creatively, to practice the art of living. Get interested, become interesting, and put your art into the world, whether its making sculpture, finding a job, or helping people. Just make art because by doing so you bring people together  – and isn’t that what art is supposed to do in the first place?

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