Goucher Eats: Baugettes and bread snobbery

Kathryn Walker
Co-Features Editor

Once upon a time, in a semester far, far away and across the seas, I was a bread snob with a capital S.  I was constantly on the prowl for another tasty-looking baguette, another opportunity to literally sink my teeth into the crux of French

Bauggettes on display in a French shop. (Photo: Google Images)

Bauggettes on display in a French shop. (Photo: Google Images)

culinary culture. I actually carried around a reusable bag in my purse that served as a baguette-holding device in times of dire need.
Walking out of a boulangerie with a warm baguette nestled under my arm, I could think of nothing better than sitting down and dipping the bread into olive oil or sandwiching some cheese into the insides, or even just tearing off a portion with my teeth. Sunday brunch was always accompanied by at least four baguettes which were consumed faster than you could say bon appétit. Fresh, handmade, and coated very softly with flour, baguettes acted as my third utensil at every meal, standing by until the moment came when the last bit of sauce or soup called out “Mop me up!” and the baguette made its appearance acting as the handy plate cleaner.
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Disruption of the global economy, can we restore confidence?

Ryan Derham
Co-Global Editor

Although the government shutdown has ended, during the crisis, United States citizens were primarily preoccupied with a labor and economic crises facing them, but this shutdown also poses problems globally. Many departments that administer U.S. global relations still ran, but this does not mean that all is well regarding international relations. The departments included the State Department and Consular Operations. Homeland Security continued with 86 percent of its staff. This meant that the Coast Guard and Border Protection remained in tact. So, the “essentials” were covered, but since the shutdown stretched over two weeks, tourism revenue was threatened. Tourists planning trips to the U.S. may have reconsidered because many museums and national parks were closed. Additionally, this extended period of time caused foreign investors to lose faith in the stability of the United States economy. This is the issue which is most pressing post-government shutdown.
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New faces on campus: Goucher welcomes eight new professors

Samantha Cooper
Staff Writer

Goucher hired eight new professors for the Fall semester. Each comes from several different disciplines and hail from various states and even from abroad.
Dr. Evan Dawley is a new assistant professor in the History department. He received his doctorate in East Asian studies from Harvard University and previously worked at the Office of the Historian in the State Department and taught at Reed College, Georgetown and George Washington University. Dawley became interested in the study of Asia when he was in high school during the protests in Tiananmen Square. When asked how he feels about Goucher after his first week, he said, “It feels right.”
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Excerpts from Abroad

Ma Vie Française
Sarah Rubinstein
Contributor

When people think of Paris, a carefully curated group of images runs through their minds: lovers strolling along the quais of the Seine, la tour Eiffel sparkling across the river from the Palais de Tokyo, the long lines for falafel in le Marais, the view from the top of the esplanade leading up to Sacre Coeur cathedral. This idea, this vision of Paris,  is anything but an accident; instead, it is the hard work and tireless effort of executives to create ad campaigns showing the art and fashion capital of the world and films showing Catherine Deneuve, Audrey Tatou, and Romain Duris playing up to the sophisticated, reserved Frenchie intellectual/bombshell that we all dream of being/being with through our childhood and into our adulthood.

As the green tour buses pass by me everyday, I only wish to scream GET OFF GO EAST SEE PARIS, but I know that is not what people want. Millions come to Paris every year, but few truly see it, and that is, frankly, exactly what they want. Few want to speak in French (they have heard Parisians are awfully cold) and few want to see the city’s eastern side (isn’t that…the ghetto…). I, for one, wanted none of that.

“You’re So Brave!”
Victoria SImons
Contributor

You’re so brave to do that!” This is a phrase that I’ve heard countless times during the past year, and every time I do I’m a little startled. Spending two semesters in a comfortable, adorable English town at a large and vibrant university, and two summers working on a historic preservation project in Northeast Germany, has never felt dangerous. And I haven’t felt particularly brave for spending twelve months away from home because I’ve been prepped by moving half-way across the country to go to Goucher.

I have had a wonderful year’s worth of travel, self-discovery, and some truely spectacular experiences, and I don’t write this now as a sob story about my failed and lonely study abroad. It hasn’t been easy, but it has been a process that I have undoubtably benefitted from, and will continue to draw meaning and inspiration from for the rest of my life. I write this in the hopes that those who will study abroad sometime in the future can learn from my lack of courage. Perhaps there is an element of bravery in leaving home to live and study in a foreign country, but remember that that is only the start. The challenge to make the most of a study abroad experience is in facing the small, daily fears of participating in a foreign culture.

Goucher Eats: Welcome to the Good Life

Kathryn Walker
Staff Writer

One week ago, I found myself tramping through the dim morning half-light to pick up my family from the airport.  My body couldn’t figure out if it wanted to sleep or wake-up: my eyes were half shut with fatigue while my legs churned beneath me, powering me down the road to the train station all the way to the airport where I found myself standing and waiting with my 20 pound backpack for my family to come out of customs.  Fortunately, I had bought five pain au chocolate the morning before for the incoming stampede of Walkers.  My rational: they needed to start off their trip correctly.  And so armed with croissants from a Meilleur Ouvrier de France, or the French equivalent of an Oscar for culinaires,  I stood there in the Charles de Gaulle airport ready to welcome them to the Good Life of Eating in Paris.

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