Eats: The land of pasta & carbs

Kathryn Walker
Co-Features Editor

I will always, till my last dying breath, be a Carb Consumer.  I will eat endless bowls of winding noodles, savor the soft insides and warmth of a fresh baguette, dole ladles and ladles of oatmeal into a seemingly endless bowl.  Carbs equal energy, plain and simple, but have also provided me with some of my most favorite memories around the table.  The spaghetti dinners with teammates, the pancakes flipped from my grandma’s stove, the radiating warmth of the boulangers’ baguette under my arm.  Scientifically, there are reasons and nerve endings and endorphins that fuel my carb-cravings; but sentimentally, I just love eating any and all sorts of carbohydrates.
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Marriage equality in Uganda

Jessica Gude 
Staff Writer

For several years in the United States, a major item on the political agenda of the national and state

Kenyan activists protest outside the Ugandan high commision over the country’s anti-gay bill (Photo: Google Images)

Kenyan activists protest outside the Ugandan high commision over the country’s anti-gay bill (Photo: Google Images)

legislators has been marriage equality.  Currently 17 states have officially legalized same sex marriage, meaning that it is legal in just over one third of the states. The global percentage is far more modest. While a total of 17 countries, mostly European and South American, have legalized same sex marriage, the general outcry as of late has been against these unions. 
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Senior reflects on future and impact of study abroad experience.Ryan Derham Co-global Editor

Ryan Derham
Co-global Editor

It’s been over one year since I returned from studying abroad in India. I remember like it was yesterday, writing in my blog the night before my plane took off: This is my chance to go and I’m taking it. With few responsibilities midway through my college career, I didn’t have to think long about who and what I was leaving behind, I just left. Since returning, my hands have found their proper place using a knife and fork – they no longer shake. But I’m starting to forget what it meant to live in a country that is not my own, what the value of the rupee is and what the heart of India looks like.
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Discovering the meaning of the study abroad experience

Zoe Malkin
Staff Writer.

How to begin an article encapsulating my time thus far in Denmark: Did I want to give little factoids about Copenhagen and its people? For example, how Danes leave their children in strollers outside of grocery stores and cafés because the city is so safe. There has never been a kidnapping in Denmark! Or, that all public libraries are closed on Sundays, a college student’s prime day for work. But I thought that I wanted to share much more than that. And so here is my attempt to encapsulate this experience.
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First impressions: Adjusting to the ‘nutty’ Danes

Eli Kaufman
Contributor

Nutty Danishes!  Sounds yummy right?  Well, now that I have grabbed your attention, I’m not talking about the delicious pastry that can be found in all of Copenhagen (and I mean ALL OVER Copenhagen).  I am talking about Danish people.

Kaufman ‘15 and Malkin ‘15 abroad in Copenhagen (Photo courtesy of Zoe Malkin)

Kaufman ‘15 and Malkin ‘15 abroad in Copenhagen (Photo courtesy of Zoe Malkin)

During orientation we were told about nutty danishes.  The Danish people, as I have come to realize in my short time here, are a bit nutty. I don’t mean that in a negative sense at all. When you eat a nut, you must first crack the shell and after you get past the hard, crunchy exterior, you get to the good part of the food, the part that is tasty and the part that satisfies your hunger needs.  You can’t do much with the shell, and you come to terms that you must do the necessary work to get to the good part in the center.
When you walk down a street in Copenhagen, you will notice people walking and keeping to themselves.  They do not make an effort to smile or look at you.  The busses that I take for a 20-minute commute to class are completely silent, except for the Americans talking amongst themselves.
First impressions are not everything.  We have always heard this expression, but we often overlook it and find ourselves making snap judgments about the people we encounter.  If I had made snap judgments about Danish people in my first week in Copenhagen, I would have believed that everyone was quiet, anti-social, and depressed (lack of sunlight, grey skies and wearing black could do that to you).
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