Goucher students perform the Vagina Monologues

Sarah Callendar
Staff Wrtier

As the pews of the chapel filled with people, one would notice that the audience

Cast of the Vagina Monologues performing on stage in the Haebler Chapel (Photo: Nora Morgan)

Cast of the Vagina Monologues performing on stage in the Haebler Chapel (Photo: Nora Morgan)

was not a typical group of church goers. The group was compromised of mostly women and some men dispersed throughout – presumed to be boyfriends. Before the performance started, conversations sprung up about how “thank god it’s Friday,” plans for the weekend, and often conversations about their Women Studies classes, or previous performances of The Vagina Monologues. And, of course, what to expect.
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Smart Art: Everywhere you looked there was art

Sara Torgerson
Arts Editor

How can we bring art culture to the American public? It seems as though museum

Photo: Google Images

Photo: Google Images

culture is reserved for a small class of people, normally seen as elitist, and that the general public only visits museums on special occasions, or not at all. This summer, art is being brought out of the museum and to the American public.
 The New York Times reported on Sunday, April 6 that five of America’s leading museums, The Whitney in New York, the National Gallery in D.C., Chicago Institute of Art, and Los Angeles County Museum of Art are working in collaboration with the Outdoor Advertising Association of America to exhibit reproductions of famous American works of art on billboards from coast to coast.
Museum directors and the OAAA created the project as a way to bring more people into galleries and museums as well as promote business for billboard advertising.
Each museum selected 20 iconic works from their collections to be voted on by the public at ArtEverywhereUS.org until May 7. The 50 selected pieces will be announced on June 20 and displayed in August. The option to vote helps make this project even more interactive. Not only is art moving outside the museum and reaching a general public, but it is actually chosen by the public. Americans will have curated the art we will see in the coming months. Thus, this project celebrates all that is American democracy, the right to partake in culture, and will honor the past artists who made American art great.

Post Punk with Patrick: Foreign Tongues comes to Bandcamp

Patrick Bransfield
Staff Writer

Massachusetts based indie-rockers Foreign Tongues released “Sweet Empathy

Photo: Google Images

Photo: Google Images

Leaving Me” on April 8.  The two song 7-inch, recorded and mixed by Boston’s Jay Maas, will also be available for streaming on Bandcamp. To promote “Sweet Empathy Leaving Me,” Foreign Tongues released a music video for the first of the two songs titled “Wishing Well.”
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Senior reflects on future and impact of study abroad experience.Ryan Derham Co-global Editor

Ryan Derham
Co-global Editor

It’s been over one year since I returned from studying abroad in India. I remember like it was yesterday, writing in my blog the night before my plane took off: This is my chance to go and I’m taking it. With few responsibilities midway through my college career, I didn’t have to think long about who and what I was leaving behind, I just left. Since returning, my hands have found their proper place using a knife and fork – they no longer shake. But I’m starting to forget what it meant to live in a country that is not my own, what the value of the rupee is and what the heart of India looks like.
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Post Punk with Patrick: The Hotelier, Like No Place is There

Patrick Bransfield
Staff Writer

The Hotelier’s (pronounced The Hotel Year) sophomore LP “Home, Like No Place is There” is

Photo Credit: Google Images

Photo Credit: Google Images

a phenomenal piece of art packed full of well-thought out song structures and solid playing. However, more than anything “Home, Like No Place is There” is a poetic account of guilt, love, destructive relationships and most prevalent – loss, experienced by singer Christian Holden. The album opens calmly with “An Introduction to the Album” as listeners practically wake-up into Holden’s shoes – “Open the curtains/ singing birds to me ‘tear the buildings down.’ You felt blessed to receive that pleasant sound.” Holden’s lyrics flow flawlessly through enjambments with a pleasant tone and coherence over soft guitars, setting the atmospheric foundation of the album. The focus shifts as Holden sheds some light on specific events such as talking a friend off of a ledge – “Just remember when you’d call me to come/ take a deep breath, and then jump.”

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