Final’s Week Calls for Yoga

Dani Meir-Levi
Staff Writer

Everyone has different ways of coping with stress. Since finals week is around the corner, many students are doing their best to try and stay sane during the home stretch of the semester. A good way to de-stress may include going to dinner with your friends, watching your favorite movie, or exercising. It depends on the person. Personally, I find that the best way to de-stress and loosen your mind is by taking a yoga class.
This mind-body practice has become extremely popular within the last 10 years. It has been known for its ability to reduce stress and boost well-being, but it also offers a wide-range of health benefits that rival other forms of exercise. For example, like cardio fitness, yoga has been known to lower the risk of heart disease and help maintain a healthy weight. Even after a few months of yoga, many seem to have improved lung capacity, anxiety relief, improved sense of balance, and surprisingly have improved sexual function. Studies have shown that yoga has been more effective in reducing pain and improving mood than standard medical treatment for certain health problem.
Charm City Yoga on Allegheny Avenue offers a 30-day trial for new yoga students. This includes one class a day. If you choose to purchase a trial online, instead of in the studio, you get an entire month of yoga for only $25! I get it – money is tight for a college student. However, taking a yoga class will surely pay off during finals week.

IT Student Survey Results

Goucher College Information Technology:

Earlier this month, we asked you for your help, insights, and opinion about technology at Goucher. Why? We want to be sure that we continue to adapt campus technology and support to meet the needs of student inside and outside the classroom. We also want you to know that your opinion matters. Why? Because Goucher students provide great suggestions.
This summer, Information Technology will be looking into expanding many of our printing services. We hope to be able to allow Web Print to work from the Goucher Visitor network, and to enable Swipe-to-Print to work on printers in other academic buildings beyond the Athenaeum.
In the beginning of the 2013-2014 academic year, the Center for Teaching Learning and Technology (CTLT) discounted the lending policy that allowed students to borrow equipment. This policy was changed primarily because of problems getting equipment returned on time if at all. For equipment that was returned we often found there were missing cables or chargers that made the devices useless to future students. The collection was also aging and required a good deal of repair. Currently, the CTLT circulates a large collection of iPad minis to professors who use them for various classroom assignments. The iPads are highly versatile and allow us to make the biggest impact for our investment.

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Alumnae/i Weekend: Goucher says goodbye to Sandy Ungar

Rachel Brustein
Co-Features Editor

During this year’s annual Alumnae/i Weekend, which took place from April 25-27,

Members Goucher community gather in the Hyman Forum for a gala in honor of Sanford Ungar (Photo: Rachel Brustein)

Members Goucher community gather in the Hyman Forum for a gala in honor of Sanford Ungar (Photo: Rachel Brustein)

over 1,000 guests were welcomed for 65 events, both on and off campus. There were special events for the reunion classes, which were for alumnae/i who graduated in years ending in 4 and 9. Cori Tyner ’82, director of alumnae/i affairs said there was a “great turnout.”
A major part of the weekend is the Alumnae and Alumni of Goucher College (AAGC) Annual Meeting. The AAGC is the governing body of the alumnae/i association. The annual meeting brings classes together, recognizes donors, and presents awards. The Jenifer Mitchell Reed ’86 Young Alumnae/i Award went to Kate Howell Bullard ’04 and John Olszewski ’04. This award always goes to an alumna or alumnus who is five to ten years out of college, recognizing him or her for volunteer service. The Ethel Cockey ’23 Award went to Judith Brigstocke Hundertmark ’54. This award is also for volunteer service, but goes to a senior alumna or alumnus. Hundertmark’s mother was also a Goucher alumna and received the same award many years ago. The Dorothy Lamberton Clapp ’39 Award, for those who have donated generously to the college, went to Jean Daniels Hawley ’59 and Mary Cole Dickerman ’59. The most prestigious award the college can give to an alumnae/i, the Award for Excellence in Public Service, went to Sherry Bebitch Jeffe ’64, a political analyst, journalist, and scholar, for the service she has done for her community.
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GSG Constitution Committee requires 100 signatures to ratify by end of academic year

Samantha Cooper
News Editor

The end of the school year is quickly approaching and with it comes the deadline for the new Constitution proposal. According to sophomore and SGA member Billy Daly, only around 100 more student signatures are needed for the bill to pass. The proposal for Goucher’s new student government requires signatures from 750 students, which is half of Goucher’s undergraduate population, in order to pass. The proposal has been already been signed by around 652 students as of press time.
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Student Life announces new Shared Vision initiative

Jaclyn Peiser
Editor-in-Chief

The Division of Student Life announced it has begun an extensive evaluation of its vision, productivity, unity, and principals. The initiative, called Shared Vision, focuses on creating a cohesive understanding and development of how the division will function in the future.
“We’re in the process of really putting together a shared vision where, as a division, we will really come together and talk about how the future of higher education is such that we will have to do a lot more with less. It’s just a reality,” Vice President and Dean of Students Bryan Coker said. “When you are having to do more with less you really have to focus…. It’s really our way of saying: ‘How do we focus for the future and on what do we focus?’”
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Goucher Eats: Senior eats finale

Kathryn Walker
Co-Features Editor

This is my belated thank you letter, the one that extends hundreds of miles and

Kathryn Walker ‘14 and her brothers outside Stimson Hall after moving in Freshman year (Photo: Courtesy of Kathryn Walker)

Kathryn Walker ‘14 and her brothers outside Stimson Hall after moving in Freshman year (Photo: Courtesy of Kathryn Walker)

oceans wide, the one that I should have written to so many people for so many things, the one that never came in the mail or still lies unwritten on my desk.  For the things big and small, heroic or ordinary, important or inconsequential.  For the people, moments, and places that have swept me off my feet and shaken my small corner of the world.  As the Dictionary of Obsolete Sorrows so aptly describes, a memory, a lifetime, “are not just the moments, not the grand gestures or the catered ceremonies, not the poised person smiling in photos, they’re the invisible things. The minutes, the cheap raw material of ordinary time.”
Four years ago, my family – both parents and all three brothers in tow – dropped me off at Goucher in the sweltering Baltimore heat for my first cross-country pre-season, my first real Goucher memory.  After four hours of unpacking, sweating, and bickering, I waved them off with a factitiously haughty, “I’ll see you at Thanksgiving – maybe.”  Five minutes later, I was lying on my bed staring at the cracks in the ceiling and wishing with all my heart that my family would hear my silent thoughts and come back for me and take me home.  I came to the conclusion that if this was what college would be like – silent, lonely, sweaty – then these next four years were going to suck.
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Staff profile: Stacy Cooper Patterson, OSE

Rachel Brustein
Co-Features Editor

Stacy Cooper Patterson has been working at Goucher since 2001 and has served in

Director of Student Engagement Stacy Cooper Patterson (Photo: Courtesy of Patterson)

Director of Student Engagement Stacy Cooper Patterson (Photo: Courtesy of Patterson)

four different positions during her time here. Currently she is the director of Student Engagement, a position she has held for almost a year, but she began as the director of Residence Life (now Community Living), then as a career counselor in the Career Development Office, and most recently as the associate director of leadership development in the Office of Student Engagement (OSE).
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