Cove Point: A chance to stop disaster in Maryland

Therese Robbins
Contributor

There is a threat coming to the state of Maryland in the form of a new plan by Dominion Resources,

Goucher students pose together before the march on the White House begins in protest of the Cove Point fracking station (Photo: Courtesy of Therese Robbins)

Goucher students pose together before the march on the White House begins in protest of the Cove Point fracking station (Photo: Courtesy of Therese Robbins)

Inc. for a $3.8 billion liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facility in Cove Point, Md. Dominion, a company based out of Richmond, Va., is one of the biggest producers and transporters of energy in the United States. They currently own an LNG import facility in Cove Point, and would like to further develop it into a fully functioning export facility. Natural gas, a fossil fuel found deep underground that consists mainly of methane, is touted as a cleaner burning fuel in comparison to coal or oil, yet there is some controversy about this source of energy. Natural gas is extracted from the ground by hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”), a process of pumping a mixture of water, sand, and chemicals into a fracking well at very high pressure and exploding the layers of rock so natural gas trapped within the rock can escape and be captured aboveground. This drilling practice and the development needed for it have been known to pollute drinking water sources like ponds or aquifers with chemicals and methane, pollute the air surrounding the drilling wells with toxic gases, deteriorate local roads, and otherwise harm or endanger local people’s well-being and livelihoods. The proposed LNG export facility would depend on this harmful drilling practice, and also require pipelines, compressor stations, and its own power plant to fuel the liquefaction of the gas.
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Johanna Kandel and life beyond your eating disorder

Sarah Pardus
Chief Copy Editor

As someone who admittedly walks past the tables in Pearlstone without stopping more often than I probably should, I know how easy it can be to ignore some of the events happening on campus. There are just so many. All. The. Time. For those of you who, like me, don’t stop at the tables to check out whatever cause is being promoted this week, you may or may not have known that last week was National Eating Disorder Awareness (NEDA) Week. I knew not because I stopped at the table, but because I am part of the statistic that is plastered all over the NEDA website. I am one of the 20 million women who will suffer from an eating disorder at some point in her life.
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Scoop’s Corner: Summer plans prove daunting

Samantha Cooper
News Editor

When did you declare your major? When did you get your first internship? Did you ever change your major? How many times? Why did you change your major? Was it difficult? I know these questions are something we all ask at one point or another. I’m thinking about declaring and I’m really unsure as to whether I should do it now or if I should wait. I already know what I want to major in – communications with a journalism emphasis. But I don’t know if I want to double major or major and minor in something else. And of course, the question is: In what? In my mind I’ve already considered English, history, and anthropology. I’ve only taken one class in each, except for English because of the writing proficiency requirement, so it’s a tough decision.
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Jennifer Lawrence challenges body image standards

Jonathan Trauner
Staff Writer

Jennifer Lawrence, one of Hollywood’s favorite young celebrities, doesn’t fall prey to many of

Jennifer Lawrence at the Oscars (Photo: Google Images)

Jennifer Lawrence at the Oscars (Photo: Google Images)

Hollywood’s stereotypes. Jennifer Lawrence instead believes that we all just need to be ourselves. Earlier this year she said, “The challenge in life is being yourself in a world that’s trying to make you like everyone else.”  Lawrence’s courage in standing up for body image equality is something I will always remember in walking the runway of life.
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Valentine’s Day is a waste of time!

Samantha Cooper
Staff Writer

Let me start by admitting that I don’t hate romantic gestures. I don’t hate the idea of giving flowers or chocolates or little gifts to loved ones. I hate that all supreme romantic gestures seem relegated to one day a year and people feel obligated to do something like spend hundreds of dollars on an overpriced dinner, flowers, jewelry or cheesy stuffed animals. Those who don’t have a significant other feel pressured to find one or feel ostracized when the holiday comes around. I have never received a real Valentine (other than elementary school when we were forced to give out Valentines) or gone out on a date or anything like that… But I’ll try to separate my personal life aside and explain why I am, quite logically, Anti-Valentine’s Day.
1) Valentine’s Day originally had a different meaning and was the feast of a saint who was known for performing weddings to soldiers who were forbidden from marrying. This somehow transformed into the commercialized pink, red, and white holiday we have today.
2) Valentine’s Day was much more fun in elementary school. It was fun making Valentines and then giving the “cool” valentines to the people you liked. Plus, you got to have candy and cupcakes and fruit punch and you got to do a whole bunch of fun holiday activities rather than actual work.
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