Post Punk with Patrick: The Hotelier, Like No Place is There

Patrick Bransfield
Staff Writer

The Hotelier’s (pronounced The Hotel Year) sophomore LP “Home, Like No Place is There” is

Photo Credit: Google Images

Photo Credit: Google Images

a phenomenal piece of art packed full of well-thought out song structures and solid playing. However, more than anything “Home, Like No Place is There” is a poetic account of guilt, love, destructive relationships and most prevalent – loss, experienced by singer Christian Holden. The album opens calmly with “An Introduction to the Album” as listeners practically wake-up into Holden’s shoes – “Open the curtains/ singing birds to me ‘tear the buildings down.’ You felt blessed to receive that pleasant sound.” Holden’s lyrics flow flawlessly through enjambments with a pleasant tone and coherence over soft guitars, setting the atmospheric foundation of the album. The focus shifts as Holden sheds some light on specific events such as talking a friend off of a ledge – “Just remember when you’d call me to come/ take a deep breath, and then jump.”

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Post Punk with Patrick: Tri-State Era Blaze Home

Patrick Bransfield
Staff Writer

Tri-State Era was originally a band comprised of a group of friends from Danbury, Connecticut. At first, it wasn’t a really serious project until their untitled 2012 demo received a decent amount of attention in the New England music scene. Their 2012 demo (which I’m nearly positive I wrote about in my first review for The Q), consisted of two songs: “Are You Listening Now?” and “Breeze Home.”  With a total run time of five minutes and 51 seconds, their self-released demo filled with emotional lyrics, fantastic drum fills, and twinkle-esque guitars left me with a hunger that only could be satisfied by more Tri-State Era. This need was satisfied in March of this year when Heads Up Records released a compilation with a single new Tri-State Era song titled “There’s Nothing You Can Tell Me,” which also happens to be the opening song on their recently released EP titled “Blaze Home.”
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Post Punk with Patrick: This Town Needs Guns

Patrick Bransfield
Staff Writer

Recently, one of my closest friends from home, Jacob Hollis, suggested a UK based math-rock band titled This Town Needs Guns. He said that

This Town Needs Guns (Photo: Bandcamp.com)

This Town Needs Guns (Photo: Bandcamp.com)

hebelieved This Town Needs Guns to be an interesting blend between the chaotic mathy riffs of The Fall of Troy and the ambient melodies of my favorite band Circa Survive. Therefore, I decided to set aside time this past weekend and thoroughly listen to their newest album “13.0.0.0.0,” which came out in January of this year. Read more of this post

Post Punk with Patrick: Into It. Over It.

Patrick Bransfield
Staff Writer

Into It. Over It.’s new album titled “Intersections” is a window in on the currently social life and emotion state of emotional music mastermind Evan Weiss. Evan

Evan Weiss (Intoit. Over it.) seen here admireing his extensive record collection (Photo: Google Images).

Evan Weiss (Intoit. Over it.) seen here admireing his extensive record collection (Photo: Google Images).

described the record as an album of updates on where his relationships previously shared in Into It. Over It. songs are currently. In that sense, it’s lyrical answer to 2011’s “PROPER,” however the songs have a distinctively different sound than “PROPER.” “Intersections” is a slower paced album that utilizes more spacious clean guitars and possesses an unbelievably raw and honest feel. This is attributed to the producer, Brian Deck, who is most notably responsible for Modest Mouse work.
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Post Punk with Patrick: Touché Amoré

Patrick Bransfield
Staff Writer

When California’s Touché Amoré released 2011’s “Parting the Seas Between Brightness and Me,” I thought that they had reached the peak of their career. And after hearing

Touché Amoré Performing live (Photo: Google Images)

Touché Amoré Performing live (Photo: Google Images)

the three split EPs put out since “Parting the Seas Between Brightness and Me,” that thought was solidified. It isn’t that the songs featured on those splits are bad, it’s just that nothing compares to “Parting the Seas Between Brightness and Me.”  It’s been over two whole years since it’s release, and it still remains to be an album I listen to several times a week. However, as of September 17, I am going to retract my statement that Touché Amoré had reached their peak.
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