Take Back the Night returns to Goucher, raises awareness

Samantha Cooper
News Editor

On Thursday, April 24 a group of students gathered in the Pearlstone Atrium for Goucher’s annual Take Back the Night event, where victims of sexual assault spoke about their experiences to others. Events like the one at Goucher take place all over the country, many at college campuses, and each does the event differently. The event typically includes a march and an opportunity for victims to speak out.
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Healthy Living: Let’s go carrot crazy!

Danielle Meir-Levi
Staff Writer

When walking through Pearlstone Café, you may be tempted to scarf down a bean burrito, munch on

Photo: Google Images

Photo: Google Images

honey-roasted nuts, or grab a delicious baked good. However, another snack option that you may not think about right away are baby carrots. Their long shelf life and affordability should make them a permanent staple in a college student’s diet. They not only contribute toward 75 percent of the daily vegetables that you should consume, but also provide a source of essential nutrients and offer a wide range of health benefits.
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Johanna Kandel and life beyond your eating disorder

Sarah Pardus
Chief Copy Editor

As someone who admittedly walks past the tables in Pearlstone without stopping more often than I probably should, I know how easy it can be to ignore some of the events happening on campus. There are just so many. All. The. Time. For those of you who, like me, don’t stop at the tables to check out whatever cause is being promoted this week, you may or may not have known that last week was National Eating Disorder Awareness (NEDA) Week. I knew not because I stopped at the table, but because I am part of the statistic that is plastered all over the NEDA website. I am one of the 20 million women who will suffer from an eating disorder at some point in her life.
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How do you pronounce that? Club profile of Capoeira Club

Sarah Hochberg
Staff Writer

Capoeira (cap – oh – air – ah; I know, it’s a mouthful) is a Brazilian martial art with African themes that imitates fighting in a peaceful and often playful dance. Aimed for all

Members of the Capoeira Club practicing in the Pearlstone Atrium. (Photo: Tori Russell)

Members of the Capoeira Club practicing in the Pearlstone Atrium. (Photo: Tori Russell)

skill levels, Capoeira has a theme of openness and community that can be understood by even the most basic of beginners. This martial art has history, dance, music, fighting, philosophy, and an intricacy of people combined into one fluid form of expression. Above all, it’s beautiful to watch and exhilarating to take part in.
In class the instructor, Skher, informs the group of Capoeira history as they sit comfortably in a circle. Originally brought over by the slave population, Capoeira developed as a way for the oppressed to learn defense in secret, so as not to gain suspicion by their masters. This martial art used to be played in the streets, had as many styles as it had participants. Master Pastinha and Master Bimba, over 100 years ago, regimented Capoeira. They set standards and founded an official Academy, adding legitimacy to the practice. These uniforms and customs consequently impact much of what Capoeira is today. Capoeira turned from a version of streetdancing to an authentic cultural art.  Goucher’s group practices an Angolian style, which integrates all aspects of the culture. Movement, dancing, fighting, and a heavy emphasis on musical instruments are woven into the sessions.
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Listening Up: Peer Listeners Support Fellow Students

Benjamin Snyder
Managing Editor

Tucked away in a secluded corner of Pearlstone is a space designated for listening and confidentiality. Called the safe space, the room serves as the destination for the college’s peer listening program for which students serve as a support system for their fellow Gophers.

The 18 peer listeners receive in-depth training, including over 60 hours in the space, as part of acceptance to the program. In its third year, the service is co-directed by founder Roshelle Kades ’10 and chaplain Cynthia Terry.

Peer Listening co-director Roshelle Kades poses in the Safe Space, where students can talk to peer listeners. (Photo: Annie Cutchen).

Peer Listening co-director Roshelle Kades poses in the Safe Space, where students can talk to peer listeners. (Photo: Annie Cutchen).

Using the logo, a conglomeration of Chinese characters, representing the words eyes, ears, attention and heart, the program’s purpose is to “create a service where students feel like they can come to someone who is genuinely listening to them in a very complete way,” said Kades.

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