Scoop’s Corner: “The Giver”

Samantha Cooper

News Editor

Most of you have probably read the book, “The Giver.” It’s the children’s version of “1984,” and “Brave New World,” and the predecessor of all Young Adult dystopia novels. Which are apparently a huge thing right now, and I wouldn’t mind if there weren’t so many love triangles! It’s getting ridiculous…

  The book version of “The Giver” had the slightest tinge of a romance, in that 12-year old Jonas develops a crush on his friend Fiona, but these are promptly eliminated with pills designed to take care of that issue. The book is mainly about a boy realizing that everything that he knew is wrong; there is a thing called color, another called music and in the time before there were Communities, people lived with their biological parents and siblings, and they felt things: both good and bad. Jonas learns about all these things from the Receiver of Memory, who he calls the Giver, because he is being trained to take his place. It’s an amazing book, full of symbolism and emotion. It’s terrible to see Jonas go through so much and make such difficult decisions, especially at such a young age.

The movie ages Jonas up to about sixteen, and has him played by a twenty-three year old (I get it. You’ll get more people if he’s hot but other than that, why?)

This makes all his actions seem more ridiculous, and idiotic in the film.

It also makes his feelings towards his friend Fiona more intense, and a bit odd especially considering that most of the time, she really doesn’t know what he’s doing. The concept of kissing and affection is absolutely foreign to her.

  The movie also changes around some of the most basic plot points of the novel, in  order to make it more “action-oriented.”

The action happens in the last third of the movie, and seems to exist only to make the movie more marketable to the “tween/young teen” crowd.

For example, in the novels, pills are distributed only to block out romantic feelings while in the movie injections are given to all citizens in order to block all emotions.

  There are other book-to-movie differences: the movie incorporated an unneeded villain, the Chief Elder, whose only goal was to stop Jonas, while in the book, the Giver (and therefore Jonas) was always contacted by the Elders before they made any major decisions and that the identifying “Giver” mark was changed from light eyes to a birth mark.

If you would like to compare the two, read the book and go out to see the movie. You will see major differences. While I understand that books and movies are two different mediums, I feel as though they could have tried harder with “The Giver,” especially since they’ve been working on a film adaptation for ages. It’s disappointing to wait for so many years, only to get a movie that won’t even be remembered by next summer. Percy Jackson fans, I now know how you feel…I never want to go through this kind of pain again.

OIS announces new study abroad policies

Samantha Cooper

News Editor

On August 19th the Interim Associate Provost for International Studies, Eric Singer, sent out an email to all staff members regarding a change to the voucher system for study abroad programs. The changes will begin with this year’s freshmen, who, rather than receiving the standard $1200 voucher will need to apply for the Goucher Global Grant. This new grant will allow financially disadvantaged students to apply for up to $2500, which will be used to cover travel expenses.

The grant is the creation of Singer, Provost Marc Roy and President José Bowen. Roy said, “The vouchers had a built-in unfairness. The system should be a more fair system.” He explained that the original voucher system was designed to cover the price of travel, regardless of where a student was going or their economic status. The new system, in his words, is “a more equitable arrangement.”

Singer emphasized that Goucher was neither cutting the study abroad requirement, nor was it cutting any programs. He also said there were talks about changing the program last year, but “no specific policy” was actually discussed. When asked whether the changes had anything to do with current economic issues, Singer said, “Everything has to do with economic issues… It would be irresponsible not to notice. The college as a whole requires us to pay attention to the bottom line.”

Roy also bought up economic issues as one of the contributing factors to the change. He also said, “The college is always looking to make study abroad costs as low as possible.” However, there would not be huge difference between the amount of money Goucher currently spends on study abroad and the amount it will spend.  He added that it would be hard to tell how the new system will work out until this year’s current freshmen go abroad in their junior or senior year. “We can always change it,” he added, “We’ll figure out what went wrong and what needs to be adjusted.”

“Our hope is that it won’t have a negative effect,” Singer said. “There will be less of a hardship for families that have financial need issues.

The application process will not be difficult. A student will need to simply check off a box when filling out their study abroad forms and the Financial Aid Office will help determine if they qualify and if so, how much. Students who choose to study abroad in non-traditional countries will have a better chance of receiving grant money. Non-traditional countries are any countries outside of Europe. Students in the U.S. and at Goucher tend to gravitate towards programs in countries like England, Spain and France.

Singer said, “These countries are closest to America, culturally and academically. We are trying to highlight other countries.” Students who choose to study in Europe, however, will not be penalized.

Goucher remains the only school the United States that requires all students to study abroad. The school offers over sixty programs in thirty-two countries and six continents. Some of the countries are: England, France, Spain, Italy, Norway, Argentina, China, Serbia, Ghana and Russia. Besides semester-long programs, Goucher also offers Intensive Courses Abroad, (ICA) which last around three weeks, and which change from year to year depending on the cost and the number of students interested. This year, Goucher added two new ICAs: one in Amsterdam and another that goes to Japan and Taiwan.

Take Back the Night returns to Goucher, raises awareness

Samantha Cooper
News Editor

On Thursday, April 24 a group of students gathered in the Pearlstone Atrium for Goucher’s annual Take Back the Night event, where victims of sexual assault spoke about their experiences to others. Events like the one at Goucher take place all over the country, many at college campuses, and each does the event differently. The event typically includes a march and an opportunity for victims to speak out.
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GSG Constitution Committee requires 100 signatures to ratify by end of academic year

Samantha Cooper
News Editor

The end of the school year is quickly approaching and with it comes the deadline for the new Constitution proposal. According to sophomore and SGA member Billy Daly, only around 100 more student signatures are needed for the bill to pass. The proposal for Goucher’s new student government requires signatures from 750 students, which is half of Goucher’s undergraduate population, in order to pass. The proposal has been already been signed by around 652 students as of press time.
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Scoop’s Corner: School’s out

Samantha Cooper
News Editor

Where has the time gone? It’s the end of the school year. Finals are coming. I’m practically a sophomore. Can somebody explain to me how this happened? Sometimes I feel as though I just got here and I’m still the girl who gets lost trying to find the entrance to Hoffberger. It feels as though the beginning of the year was a lifetime ago. That’s probably because so much has changed in the past nine months.
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Scoop’s Corner: Processing tragedy

Samantha Cooper
News Editor

I’m not really sure what to say at the moment. I didn’t know Matt Gabriel, but like everyone else, I was distraught about his death. It reminds me that some of the smaller things in life – a test grade, an essay, movie spoilers, slow Internet– aren’t as big of an issue as they seem.
Three days after Matt’s death, my Nana died. It was a peaceful death. She passed in her sleep. Still, the knowledge that she didn’t suffer doesn’t make it any easier.
As college students, it seems as though we have our whole lives ahead of us – like our future is a big empty slate just waiting to be filled. Matt’s death reminds us that we don’t always get to fill it. I think that’s why the deaths of those who die young hurt. There’s so much room for them to grow, and so much potential for the person they can be. We see ourselves as immortal because we cannot imagine dying before we have the chance to make a difference in the world.
When somebody who has lived a full life dies, we weep because there is an empty hole in the world. My Nana used to be a teacher. She affected two generations of students instilling in them a love of learning.She was a great woman who enjoyed the simpler thing in life: a good book, good food, and good times with family.
These aren’t my first experiences with the death; I had a friend die from cancer when I was in middle school. I had only known him a few months and I knew he was sick, but knowing somebody is going die doesn’t help the pain either. There’s still the sting and pain of loss.
I know this column is to document the struggles of being a college student, intertwined with humorous self-deprecating comments about my lack of social life, but it doesn’t seem appropriate to talk about either of those. And right now, the loss of these two people is important in my life. These two people are now gone forever, and the only true thing that remains are the memories we have of them. I just want to tell those of you still mourning that you are not alone. It’s okay to cry, even if you didn’t know him very well. It means you are human.
That’s the most important thing to note: we are human. We are born, we live for a while, maybe fall in love and have children, and eventually, we die. Some people live longer than others, and we have no way of knowing who those people are going to be. We just don’t. No matter how advanced human society becomes, it’ll be impossible to determine just how long somebody will live. We can strive to live as long as possible by eating healthy and exercising, but we can’t predict what will happen when we cross a street. We may cross safely, but sometimes we don’t.
As the year is closing, and with this being my penultimate column for this year, I would like to say: College is not the defining years of your life. College does not determine how successful you’ll be. College is just another chapter in your life.Still, you should still enjoy the time you spend here.
My heart goes out to Matt’s family, and I can only hope that his memory will live on for a long time. My heart also goes out to my own family. Hopefully my Nana Judy’s memory will also live on. For both of them, I hope people’s memories of them are good, and inspire some sort of positive change in the world.

International Center in Julia Rogers dedicated to Dr. Wolfgang Thormann

Samantha Cooper
News Editor

The new Thormann International Center in Julia Rogers was dedicated on April 5 in honor of Dr. Wolfgang Thormann. Thormann was the chair of the Modern Languages Department at Goucher from 1969-1989. Today, the department is called the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures. While working, he opened  the original Thormann International and Technology Center in Froelicher Hall, and the  building was dedicated to him. His dream was to have Froelicher Hall made into a language dorm. Though Froelicher was not turned into a language dorm, it still houses the original Thormann International Center.
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