Take Back the Night returns to Goucher, raises awareness

Samantha Cooper
News Editor

On Thursday, April 24 a group of students gathered in the Pearlstone Atrium for Goucher’s annual Take Back the Night event, where victims of sexual assault spoke about their experiences to others. Events like the one at Goucher take place all over the country, many at college campuses, and each does the event differently. The event typically includes a march and an opportunity for victims to speak out.
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GSG Constitution Committee requires 100 signatures to ratify by end of academic year

Samantha Cooper
News Editor

The end of the school year is quickly approaching and with it comes the deadline for the new Constitution proposal. According to sophomore and SGA member Billy Daly, only around 100 more student signatures are needed for the bill to pass. The proposal for Goucher’s new student government requires signatures from 750 students, which is half of Goucher’s undergraduate population, in order to pass. The proposal has been already been signed by around 652 students as of press time.
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Scoop’s Corner: School’s out

Samantha Cooper
News Editor

Where has the time gone? It’s the end of the school year. Finals are coming. I’m practically a sophomore. Can somebody explain to me how this happened? Sometimes I feel as though I just got here and I’m still the girl who gets lost trying to find the entrance to Hoffberger. It feels as though the beginning of the year was a lifetime ago. That’s probably because so much has changed in the past nine months.
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Scoop’s Corner: Processing tragedy

Samantha Cooper
News Editor

I’m not really sure what to say at the moment. I didn’t know Matt Gabriel, but like everyone else, I was distraught about his death. It reminds me that some of the smaller things in life – a test grade, an essay, movie spoilers, slow Internet– aren’t as big of an issue as they seem.
Three days after Matt’s death, my Nana died. It was a peaceful death. She passed in her sleep. Still, the knowledge that she didn’t suffer doesn’t make it any easier.
As college students, it seems as though we have our whole lives ahead of us – like our future is a big empty slate just waiting to be filled. Matt’s death reminds us that we don’t always get to fill it. I think that’s why the deaths of those who die young hurt. There’s so much room for them to grow, and so much potential for the person they can be. We see ourselves as immortal because we cannot imagine dying before we have the chance to make a difference in the world.
When somebody who has lived a full life dies, we weep because there is an empty hole in the world. My Nana used to be a teacher. She affected two generations of students instilling in them a love of learning.She was a great woman who enjoyed the simpler thing in life: a good book, good food, and good times with family.
These aren’t my first experiences with the death; I had a friend die from cancer when I was in middle school. I had only known him a few months and I knew he was sick, but knowing somebody is going die doesn’t help the pain either. There’s still the sting and pain of loss.
I know this column is to document the struggles of being a college student, intertwined with humorous self-deprecating comments about my lack of social life, but it doesn’t seem appropriate to talk about either of those. And right now, the loss of these two people is important in my life. These two people are now gone forever, and the only true thing that remains are the memories we have of them. I just want to tell those of you still mourning that you are not alone. It’s okay to cry, even if you didn’t know him very well. It means you are human.
That’s the most important thing to note: we are human. We are born, we live for a while, maybe fall in love and have children, and eventually, we die. Some people live longer than others, and we have no way of knowing who those people are going to be. We just don’t. No matter how advanced human society becomes, it’ll be impossible to determine just how long somebody will live. We can strive to live as long as possible by eating healthy and exercising, but we can’t predict what will happen when we cross a street. We may cross safely, but sometimes we don’t.
As the year is closing, and with this being my penultimate column for this year, I would like to say: College is not the defining years of your life. College does not determine how successful you’ll be. College is just another chapter in your life.Still, you should still enjoy the time you spend here.
My heart goes out to Matt’s family, and I can only hope that his memory will live on for a long time. My heart also goes out to my own family. Hopefully my Nana Judy’s memory will also live on. For both of them, I hope people’s memories of them are good, and inspire some sort of positive change in the world.

International Center in Julia Rogers dedicated to Dr. Wolfgang Thormann

Samantha Cooper
News Editor

The new Thormann International Center in Julia Rogers was dedicated on April 5 in honor of Dr. Wolfgang Thormann. Thormann was the chair of the Modern Languages Department at Goucher from 1969-1989. Today, the department is called the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures. While working, he opened  the original Thormann International and Technology Center in Froelicher Hall, and the  building was dedicated to him. His dream was to have Froelicher Hall made into a language dorm. Though Froelicher was not turned into a language dorm, it still houses the original Thormann International Center.
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Scoop’s Corner: The common cold is getting old

Samantha Cooper
News Editor

Well it happened: I finally got sick. I’m not sure what it was, but the Tuesday after spring break, my throat hurt, I was exhausted, and I had a stuffy nose and headache. By Wednesday, I was coughing my lungs out. Thursday, I left one of my classes early because I wasn’t feeling well. I probably should have rested more during the weekend, but I had a ton of homework and a supply of Advil so nothing was going to stop me except pure and utter exhaustion.
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Islamic Awareness Week raises questions about diversity

Samantha Cooper
News Editor

Goucher held its very first Islamic Awareness Week from March 25 to March 28. The week included a four-day event that involved a student panel, two guest speakers, and a film screening. First year student Samer Salem said he organized the event because there was “a lot of misguided anti-Islamic rhetoric [on campus],” he said. “I researched every college I applied to, but I knew it was going to be an issue on campus beforehand, and I still chose to attend for specific reasons. However, knowing it is an issue and being within the community are two different things … though I told myself I’m not allowed to complain because I was aware of the problem.”
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