Alumnae/i Weekend: Goucher says goodbye to Sandy Ungar

Rachel Brustein
Co-Features Editor

During this year’s annual Alumnae/i Weekend, which took place from April 25-27,

Members Goucher community gather in the Hyman Forum for a gala in honor of Sanford Ungar (Photo: Rachel Brustein)

Members Goucher community gather in the Hyman Forum for a gala in honor of Sanford Ungar (Photo: Rachel Brustein)

over 1,000 guests were welcomed for 65 events, both on and off campus. There were special events for the reunion classes, which were for alumnae/i who graduated in years ending in 4 and 9. Cori Tyner ’82, director of alumnae/i affairs said there was a “great turnout.”
A major part of the weekend is the Alumnae and Alumni of Goucher College (AAGC) Annual Meeting. The AAGC is the governing body of the alumnae/i association. The annual meeting brings classes together, recognizes donors, and presents awards. The Jenifer Mitchell Reed ’86 Young Alumnae/i Award went to Kate Howell Bullard ’04 and John Olszewski ’04. This award always goes to an alumna or alumnus who is five to ten years out of college, recognizing him or her for volunteer service. The Ethel Cockey ’23 Award went to Judith Brigstocke Hundertmark ’54. This award is also for volunteer service, but goes to a senior alumna or alumnus. Hundertmark’s mother was also a Goucher alumna and received the same award many years ago. The Dorothy Lamberton Clapp ’39 Award, for those who have donated generously to the college, went to Jean Daniels Hawley ’59 and Mary Cole Dickerman ’59. The most prestigious award the college can give to an alumnae/i, the Award for Excellence in Public Service, went to Sherry Bebitch Jeffe ’64, a political analyst, journalist, and scholar, for the service she has done for her community.
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Board of Trustees announces Jose Bowen as 11th president

Rachel Brustein
Co-Features Editor

On Wednesday, March 12, the Office of Communications sent an email to the

The next president of Goucher College Jose Bowen and his family. (Photo courtesy of Jose Bowen)

The next president of Goucher College Jose Bowen and his family. (Photo courtesy of Jose Bowen)

Goucher community announcing José Antonio Bowen as the college’s next president.
Bowen, who is currently the dean of Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University, is from Cuban ancestry and was raised near Barcelona. His family moved to California when he was five years old and he lived there through college and graduate school. Though he originally wanted to attend a conservatory for college, Bowen ended up going to Stanford, where he earned a B. A. in chemistry after changing his major nine times. He went on to earn Masters degrees in music composition and humanities and a PhD in musicology and humanities, also from Stanford.
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Campus vandalism: we’re not amused

Victoria Russell
Staff Writer

Ah, it is that time of the year. The annual email from President Ungar addressing the vandalism on our beautiful Goucher campus has arrived. This year, we have boosted our numbers from 24 incidents last year to 29 as of October 7. Let’s take a look at some of the incidents that have occurred. Did you know that students have already damaged five exit signs? Someone also damaged a fire extinguisher sign. Someone slashed tires on a car? Two cars were keyed? Were you having a Carrie Underwood moment and you decided to get revenge on an ex?
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Frank Bruni speaks frankly about gay marriage

Frank Bruni with President Sandy Ungar after his talk in the Hymann Forum. (Photo Christopher Riley)

Frank Bruni with President Sandy Ungar after his talk in the Hymann Forum. (Photo Christopher Riley)

Sarah Hochberg
Staff Writer

When Frank Bruni spoke, he made me laugh, he made me cry, and he made me think. The crowd absolutely loved him, and for good reasons. Bruni is fiercely intelligent, and hey – the man’s funny. He graduated second in his class with an M.S. degree in journalism from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, where he won a Pulitzer Traveling Fellowship. In 1995 he joined the New York Times as a restaurant critic. He went from cold facts to stark opinion in 2011, and Bruni’s current claim-to-fame is that he is the New York Times’ first openly gay op-ed columnist.
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Academic Internship Fee Set to Start in Summer 2013

Benjamin Snyder
Managing and News Editor

President Sanford Ungar sent an email to the Goucher community on Dec. 19 announcing a fee for academic internships, which carry typically three to four credits, at $450 per credit. The new fee will be implemented beginning summer 2013.

According to Student Government Association (SGA) President Dashell Fittry ’13, “Sandy is slated to speak to Senate, the tentative date is Feb. 20th. Once that date is confirmed, an email will be sent to the student body talking more in depth about the policy and about Sandy attending Senate.”

In his email, Ungar wrote, “After careful consideration, we have determined that students should pay for the academic credits they receive while attending Goucher regardless of how such credits are earned, and have therefore decided to make a change to our internship credit policy.”

The choice to charge students $450, according to Ungar, was reached as it “is the same amount currently charged for students taking courses during the summer.”

According to Laurie Burton-Graham, Goucher’s Executive Vice President and General Counsel, the decision to attach a cost to academic internships taking place during summer, winter, or when a student is taking over the 18-credit limit during the academic year, was reached by members of senior staff. “I can’t remember if it was brought up to college council or not to be honest, but I know senior staff spent a lot of time talking about it,” she said.

Burton-Graham continued that the discussion began at the start of the academic year in the fall and the college’s Vice Presidents made a formal recommendation to Ungar in November ahead of his Dec. 19 email.

Traci Martin, the Director of the Career Development Office (CDO), said that conversations about charging for academic internship credits have taken place “for years.” She continued, “We have been asked in the last couple years to do some research and benchmarking with our peer institutions. We were having conversations with [former] Vice President and Dean of Students [Gail] Edmonds and [Provost] Marc Roy about what exists, providing numbers, how many students get credit.”

In the email, Ungar cited reasons for the additional fee. “We anticipate that the additional income to the college, while helpful, will be limited,” he wrote. “Rather, the policy of charging fairly for all academic credits received is one that honors the value of a Goucher education and, ultimately, a Goucher degree.”

Burton-Graham mirrored Ungar’s opinion, saying, “Charging for credits is standard practice and it’s good practice and it’s practice at most of our peer institutions. In fact, it’s practiced at most higher education institutions.” She continued, “It says something of a value of a Goucher degree and a Goucher education.”

She later added, “This isn’t a huge windfall for the college, it’s more about the principle.”

Although further discussions about where the money will be placed is likely to continue, Burton-Graham said, “I think the decision to charge the fee is done. I would be very surprised if Sandy is going to revisit that decision.”

After students received Ungar’s email, a Facebook group was created, titled, “Gophers Against New Policies,” which drew over 400 students. Said Fittry, “It is nice to see the students so passionate about an issue, but as with many ‘campaigns’ on Facebook, the students lose interest and the group dies off. This happened to this group within a week.”

Instead, Fittry hopes students will email their SGA representatives to voice concerns in the future. He explained, “Over 400 people joined the group, but only 16, [or] 4% of the group, people took the initiative to contact me personally which says something about the effectiveness of online campaigns like the one that was launched for this policy change.”

According to Martin, the first cycle of students getting internships in the summer will prove helpful as the discussion moves forward. “I don’t think this is the end of it,” she said. “I think we’ll need to continue to look at what the departments will do, the choices students will make.”

While Fittry said he personally “doesn’t have a problem with the policy,” he continued, “as SGA President, it is my duty to address the concerns of the student body which I have done and which will be further discussed at Senate with President Ungar.” He continued, “I think once the student body gets all the facts and understands the policy a bit more they will come to agree with me that this policy makes sense and is going to be beneficial to the campus.”

Martin believes the first summer of internships with the fee will be telling. “We’re really just going to have to go through a cycle this summer and see what happens and evaluate it and adjust as best we can,” she said

Club Presidents, Administration React to Revised Trips Policy

Benjamin Snyder
Managing Editor

After a revised transportation policy was put into effect on a one-year trial basis by members of senior staff on Friday, September 28, heads of various clubs affected by the policy and Associate Dean of Student Engagement (OSE) Emily Perl, who helped draft the policy, expressed views about the changes.

Under the new policy, student clubs and organizations on campus must bring along a faculty advisor and pay for professional transportation services for trips taking place outside of a 250-mile radius from the college’s campus unless waived.

President Sanford Ungar attends a Student Government Association senate meeting to answer questions. (Photo: Christopher Riley).

The latest version of the policy was announced in a Student Government Association (SGA) Senate meeting on October 3.

Perl could not attend the Senate meeting due to a faculty meeting, although she noted, “it was reported back to [her] that SGA felt good about the changes and the way in which they had been able to voice their concerns and have their opinions taken into consideration.”

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