Reflections from The Q senior editors

The Quindecim staff members at the year end party (Photo: Nora Morgan)

The Quindecim staff members at the year end party (Photo: Nora Morgan)

Jaclyn Peiser
Editor-In-Chief

It was my third week at Goucher when I decided to get involved with The Q. At my first meeting, I pitched two features articles, a news article, and a freshman column. They gave me one of the feature stories and the column. Thus began the beginning of a transformative, essential, and defining experience to my time at Goucher.
I have learned so much from this newspaper: How to work with difficult people, how to take and respond to criticism, how to be an effective leader, how to stay organized and productive, and how to put out a newspaper every two weeks. But most importantly, I have learned that being a journalist is something I am meant to do when I graduate. I look forward to attending Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism this August, honing and developing the skills I have learned through The Q.
Although the job of Editor-in-Chief can be stressful, tough, and unappreciated, it has been overwhelmingly rewarding. I am so thankful that I have had the opportunity to work with such an amazing and supportive editorial staff and that our faculty advisor, David Zurawik, has been an invaluable source of guidance and support. But, I am even more thankful to the previous Quindecim editors, who saw my potential and allowed me to move up the ranks.

Ryan Derham
Co-Global Editor

When I try to remember the person I was when I moved into Goucher College my freshman year, I can’t really. Change happens so slowly, I couldn’t tell you the moment I became a confident writer, a passionate learner, a determined tennis player. The accomplishments we’ve all made are important, and the goals we’ve yet to reach are not there to taunt us. They are there to drive us forward. Seniors, we may be unsure of ourselves, but there are things we take for granted everyday. When things become stressful, remember those things we are so fortunate to have. Lastly, a quote, because we are never too old to believe: “And above all, watch with glittering eyes all around you, because the greatest secrets are always hidden in the most unlikely places. Those who don’t believe in magic will never find it.”
-Roald Dahl

Christine Cherry
Sports  Editor

I have really enjoyed my time working on The Q! I was really fortunate to be taken in with open arms despite being new this year. I always looked forward to the meetings, laughs, and spelling errors. It was a great run!

Jessica Hallstrom
Co-Global Editor

I remember my first Q meeting in the first few weeks of freshman year – sitting in the back of the office on the big couch, I was so excited to get a chance to write for the student paper. Though I’ve had various degrees of involvement with The Quindecim over the past four years, I have the same passion for it now as I did during that first meeting. I hope that the upcoming years will bring it the recognition that it deserves and that The Q will continue to be a respected outlet for students to voice their opinions and hone their talents as journalists.

Sara Torgerson
Arts Editor

The past couple of months I have been trying to practice the art of leaving college with a certain sprezzatura. I find that this is damn near impossible. My time at Goucher has been… well… formative. Who I am as a person today has been the result of the forming, shaping, and reshaping of my character by friends, classes, professors, and of course, extra-curricular influences like writing and editing for The Q.
I started writing for The Q last year when the Ecce Homo wall fresco crisis in Spain happened. I thought the whole Jesus mural debauchery was hysterical and needed to write something in response. Since that first article, The Q has become a constant labor of love, and an  every-two-weeks reminder to reflect on Arts and a source of stress when chasing after writers to get their articles in – I mean you Patrick.
The Q has been a source of laughter, support, and brought me together with some of my favorite people. Allison Panetta ‘13 thought up the title of my column, Smart Art, last year on the office couch. In the office itself, there have been a lot of new friends, laughs, tears, stress, and perspectives changed, but like college, it is now time to leave The Q and to pass it on to the next generation of students who will make their own memories.

Sarah Pardus
Chief Copy Editor

Four years ago, I walked into The Q office terrified. I enjoyed writing, but I didn’t want people to judge me. I was intimidated by the editors and afraid to speak up or write any articles. I wrote less than five newspaper articles during my first two years at Goucher, instead copyediting hundreds of others.
It wasn’t until I became the chief copy editor that it clicked for me. I was more confident in my writing after reading everyone else’s. I loved sports and began writing athlete profiles, a  beat that became mine.
Senior year, I stuck with my role as chief copy editor, but I stepped further out of my comfort zone. I actually opened my mouth at the meetings, I wasn’t afraid to walk into The Q office, and I wrote articles outside of the sports section that I knew and loved. I connected with people I otherwise would have never known. I found a place for myself at Goucher outside of being an athlete.

Christopher Riley
Associate Editor

From the first education class I took freshman year to field work this semester, it’s hard to believe what I thought would happen in college versus what actually happened. Coming off yearbook and the newsletter in high school, I vowed to take these four years off from journalism, being a leader, and doing all of the crazy things I used to do in high school. Do I regret it? Of course not. Would I do it again the same way? Maybe. Do I think I’m a more well-rounded person for pushing through it all? Yes.
I can’t begin to tell you how much the friends I’ve made here mean to me and can’t begin to tell you how many feelings I have coming to the realization that there will be some people I won’t ever see again. It actually makes me a little sad. I hope that those people feel somewhat the same feelings. Graduation is 18 days away, there’s nothing I can do about that, and while I can’t wait for it to get here, I know it’ll be one of the hardest days I ever face.
All I can do now is what do every day… Try to take over the world!

Kathryn Walker
Co-Features Editor

My time with The Q started my freshman year with an interview with Billie Weiss, then editor-in-chief of The Quindecim. Imagine an interview about writing a column with a senior who wore wingtip shoes – intimidating, to say the least. But somehow, four years later, I’m still writing a food column, albeit one that has morphed into something that encompasses more than just food. “Goucher Eats” reflects my growth  concerning culture, food science, and more. I have been given a space to express my thoughts, experiences, and recipes. And through this editing experience, I have come to form friendships with fellow wordsmiths and Gophers that have made this fourth and final year at Goucher year such a memorable one. Merci beaucoup!

Smart Art: Everywhere you looked there was art

Sara Torgerson
Arts Editor

How can we bring art culture to the American public? It seems as though museum

Photo: Google Images

Photo: Google Images

culture is reserved for a small class of people, normally seen as elitist, and that the general public only visits museums on special occasions, or not at all. This summer, art is being brought out of the museum and to the American public.
 The New York Times reported on Sunday, April 6 that five of America’s leading museums, The Whitney in New York, the National Gallery in D.C., Chicago Institute of Art, and Los Angeles County Museum of Art are working in collaboration with the Outdoor Advertising Association of America to exhibit reproductions of famous American works of art on billboards from coast to coast.
Museum directors and the OAAA created the project as a way to bring more people into galleries and museums as well as promote business for billboard advertising.
Each museum selected 20 iconic works from their collections to be voted on by the public at ArtEverywhereUS.org until May 7. The 50 selected pieces will be announced on June 20 and displayed in August. The option to vote helps make this project even more interactive. Not only is art moving outside the museum and reaching a general public, but it is actually chosen by the public. Americans will have curated the art we will see in the coming months. Thus, this project celebrates all that is American democracy, the right to partake in culture, and will honor the past artists who made American art great.

Smart Art: Pink and gender roles in the art world

Sara Torgerson
Arts Editor

For the past couple of months I have been thinking about gender roles. I think of my introductory

Expressive piece representing pink as the color of life (Photo: Google Images)

Expressive piece representing pink as the color of life (Photo: Google Images)

lessons from Simone de Beauvoir’s “The Second Sex” and her proclamation that women are more loyal to men of their same class or social circle than women who share their struggle as the “second sex.” Beauvoir recognized the ways in which women have played a part in their own oppression. I see myself and others do this too. Until recently, I always competed with other women in the arts rather than see how we could work together. Sometimes it seems as though there are only so many positions for women, therefore, one must stomp on the fingers of others.
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Smart Art: Starting the conversation

Sara Torgerson
Arts Editor

On Feb. 5 students at Wellesley College, just outside of Boston, were startled to see the figure of a half naked man, lost in the

The Sleep Walker statue at Wellesley College (Photo: Google)

The Sleep Walker statue at Wellesley College (Photo: Google)

snow. At first glance the man is middle aged, wearing nothing but white briefs, and has a small belly hanging over his waistband. His arms are stretch out causing him to appear like he’s grabbing for something or is confused. At first glance you cannot tell if he’s real or not, but after a couple minutes, one realizes that he’s definitely a sculpture.
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Smart Art: Art, at what cost?

Sara Torgerson
Arts Editor

Over the break I went to a museum that I have long wanted to visit, but have not had the chance to do so. When I walked up to the ticket counter at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art I quickly realized why. I had always been under the age of 17 or a member of the museum, so my admission would have been free. Because I am neither of those things, the total ticket cost for my father and I was $40. That amounts to $20 each. I realize that $20 for admission to museum as well as tickets to a special exhibition is not that much in the grand scope of things, but I could not help but think, why isn’t this free?
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Musings of a second-semester senior

Sara Torgerson
Arts Editor

Here we are, three and a half years in and only 15 weeks until I will have finished my undergraduate degree. We are in the home stretch – running toward what? As I start this last semester my days are filled with constant stress, excitement, questions, and, most of all, fear.
Every day I ask myself, “What the hell am I going to do with my life?” Unfortunately, everyone else I know is asking me the same question.  The only people who avoid any topic matter concerning the months after May 23rd are my fellow peers who will be walking at commencement. I think most of us have come together in solidarity in the fact that we don’t really have a clue. This results in panic.
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Smart Art: Ellsworth Kelly and careless curating

Sara Torgerson
Arts Editor

On Nov. 16 I had the chance to drop by the National Gallery’s small exhibition on

Ellsworth Kelly in front of one of his color paper paintings. (Photo: Google Images)

Ellsworth Kelly in front of one of his color paper paintings. (Photo: Google Images)

Ellsworth Kelly’s color paper compositions. At first I was excited because a couple years ago I saw a Kelly show in New York. The exhibition there was brilliant. It was a huge retrospective set up like a maze. The show told the story of his plant drawings and how they came to be.
The drawing are simple, like most of Kelly’s work –just black squiggly lines on paper. Still it was amazing and one I visited several times.
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