GSG Constitution Committee requires 100 signatures to ratify by end of academic year

Samantha Cooper
News Editor

The end of the school year is quickly approaching and with it comes the deadline for the new Constitution proposal. According to sophomore and SGA member Billy Daly, only around 100 more student signatures are needed for the bill to pass. The proposal for Goucher’s new student government requires signatures from 750 students, which is half of Goucher’s undergraduate population, in order to pass. The proposal has been already been signed by around 652 students as of press time.
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GSG releases proposed constitution, requires 750 votes

Samantha Cooper
News Editor

The Student Government Association held a meeting on March 31 to discuss the

Billy Daly ‘16 speaking to the Goucher community about the proposed constitution (Photo: Chrisotpher Riley)

Billy Daly ‘16 speaking to the Goucher community about the proposed constitution (Photo: Chrisotpher Riley)

changes that will occur in the Goucher student government if the proposed constitution is ratified. The proposal, which requires 750 student signatures, will change the student government drastically.
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SGA committee rewrites constitution, prepares for student vote

Jessica Gude
Staff Writer

In the last few days of January term, the Student Government Association (SGA) Constitutional Committee met to rewrite the SGA constitution. The group of 13 students was formed last fall after members of the student assembly expressed problems with the constitution. The committee gathered feedback and made major changes to the constitution. The structure of the senate, the class council, election procedures, and the name of the student government have undergone a near-complete transformation. The new form of student government is called Goucher Student Government (GSG).
Complaints about the old constitution and the old student government were wide ranging. Many students felt a lack of communication and connection to government processes. More specifically, students expressed a lack of transparency between students, student government officers, administration, and faculty. For example, Senate positions were only granted to clubs, leaving those students not involved without a voice.
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