Arts

Fashion forward or utterly un-stylish?

Annabeth Lucas
Staff Writer

Whether it is bare feet scuffling down Van Meter, Aztec print belly-shirts waiting in line at Pearlstone, or sweatpants lounging around in an eight AM class, Goucher’s campus exhibits some truly unique styles.  In a quest to understand all this diverse fashion, the Q recently took to the streets – or Van Meter – revealing the wardrobes of a few Goucher students.

Arin San Agusten:
For Arin San Agusten, popular trends hold no weight. “I just have my own sense of style that I try to always go for,” the sophomore explains.  His hometown of Berkley,

Photo: Anabeth Lucas

Photo: Annabeth Lucas

California may have the only influence over his closet, for “everyone is an individual and everyone has their own style” San Agusten describes.  His wardrobe is a blend of new and old, as he shops everywhere from Urban Outfitters to local Goodwills. His go-to outfit includes “dark jeans that are comfy … Clark leather shoes … and then whatever shirt works well with it.” With a sheepish grin and a little encouragement, San Agusten offers up some style advice to Goucher students, “wear shoes.”

Chloee DaYeon Choi:
For other students, the internet offers fashion inspiration. This is the case for Chloee DaYeon Choi, who frequents a style vlog called “Clothes Encounters” for ideas. “I watch her videos all the time” the sophomore exclaims. DaYeon Choi then shops at stores such as Zara and Bershka to achieve her style.  She is also quite observant of Goucher’s fashion, stating that “everybody has something in common, but different in their own way too.  It’s kind of like a ‘modern hippie’ look.”

Photo: Annabeth Lucas

Photo: Annabeth Lucas

Sharon Landstorm:
Collared shirts, black tees, stripes, and sweaters dominate Sharon Landstrom’s closet. “I have a favorite tee-shirt,” she says. “It’s a black and there’s a monster on the front handing a balloon – that is actually the moon – to and astronaut.” To top off this outfit, the junior from New Jersey usually adds black jeans and green Vans. In terms of Goucher’s style, Landstrom observes that “[a] lot of people wear sweatpants everywhere.” When asked if this was good or bad, she immediately replies, “that’s a bad thing.”

Grant Warren:
Shoeless Grant Warren claims that college is cutting down on his wardrobe. “I’m trying to get rid of a lot of it,” he explains, keeping just “comfortable clothing, because that’s all I tend to wear.” The Massachusetts native has noted a “city” and “urban get-up” with “earthy vibes” on Goucher’s campus. Although partial to brands such as REI and L.L. Bean, Warren ultimately admits, “I don’t know much about fashion.”

Chloe Gooditis:
Winchester, Virginia’s Chloe Gooditis looks to her parents for clothing inspiration, confessing, “I like to steal my mom’s fashion

Photo: Annabeth Lucas

Photo: Annabeth Lucas

from when she was younger. This vest is hers actually!” The first-year’s process of choosing an outfit is surprisingly organized for a college student. “I try and do it the night before—I look at the weather and everything,” she says. Whether or not that outfit is actually worn, however, is uncertain, for Gooditis admits, “I get up the next morning and change my mind. Sometimes I go through like five options.”

Camille Musson:
Sophomore Camille Muson’s morning fashion routine is relatively simple. “Smell it, put it on,” she explains. The Los Angeles native says her clothing choices reflect those of her mother as well. “She always looks really comfortable,” Muson admits, “like ninety percent of my clothes are my mother’s.” Although comfort is a priority, Muson describes another interesting influence on her clothing. “I love Seattle, and I love Seattle in the nineties,” she says, “specifically the seedy bathroom of an Alice in Chains concert.” Back at Goucher, however, Muson has some complaints about the trends on campus this year. “There are so many belly-shirts … I’m really overseeing the bellies,” she says. “If the bellies continue towards the end of September, I’m going to have an issue.”

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