Arts

Post Punk with Patrick: Foreign Tongues comes to Bandcamp

Patrick Bransfield
Staff Writer

Massachusetts based indie-rockers Foreign Tongues released “Sweet Empathy

Photo: Google Images

Photo: Google Images

Leaving Me” on April 8.  The two song 7-inch, recorded and mixed by Boston’s Jay Maas, will also be available for streaming on Bandcamp. To promote “Sweet Empathy Leaving Me,” Foreign Tongues released a music video for the first of the two songs titled “Wishing Well.”
“Wishing Well” displays Foreign Tongues’ best work to date as they hone into their sound, complete with heavy snare hits, slightly-distorted guitar strumming, and deep and raspy vocal work. At just over three minutes, Foreign Tongues wastes no time on “Wishing Well,” immediately counting listeners in to the laid-back riffage they strive in. By the time the vocals enter, Foreign Tongues have already added several guitar layers to the track, creating a lot of depth and emphasizing the band’s deep sound.
The song persists with the same pulse the entire time, exploring the riff in several different ways. My favorite part of the song takes place about a minute into the track, as the guitarists hold off and build feedback behind the consistent drums and reverberating vocal work. This effect builds tension and a slight crescendo before the band suspends the verse with a pulsing ride groove and heavy bass plucks.
Foreign Tongues then glides through a chorus with the words “Inside a wishing well/ is where we lost ourselves/ it’s where you left me.” The drums then take over and become louder in the mix, guiding the band through the final seconds of “Wishing Well” with flashy and slightly altered patterns.
As displayed by “Wishing Well,” Foreign Tongues is growing more and more comfortable in their sound overtime. While “Wishing Well” fades out, I’m not only made eager to hear “Flourish,” the second song on “Sweet Empathy Leaving Me,” but I’m also left asking, “When will these guys release a full length?” as Foreign Tongues creates a unique, almost grungy take on alternative/indie pop-rock that can’t be recreated elsewhere.

Advertisements

Comments

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s